Jeffrey Talpins macro fund, Element Capital Management, raised $2 billion capital in March 2017.

It was not only the staggering amount that Jeffrey Talpins macro fund was able to raise but also the ease in which the fund manager was able to raise capital, in just two weeks that made the headlines.

A band of big investors had agreed to invest $2 billion capital in Jeffrey Talpins fund which focuses on macro events.

Jeffrey Talpins macro fund, Element Capital Management, raised $2 billion capital in March 2017

 

The injection of capital into Jeffrey Talpins macro fund raises the firm’s assets under management to $12 billion.

Most of the investors in Jeffrey Talpins macro fund comes from existing clients, according to a spokesperson for Element Capital Management.

Element has been closed to new investors since last April when Jeffrey Talpins (macro funds) raised $1.5 billion in one month.

Element has fewer than 40 investors and is among the more sought-after hedge funds. Last year Jeffrey Talpins’ fund gained 19.4 percent, making it one of the world’s top-performing macro funds, and in 2015 it rose almost 23 percent.

Since its 2005 inception, the fund has returned an annualized 21 percent, the person said.

The injection of capital into Jeffrey Talpins macro fund raises the firm’s assets under management to $12 billion

 

In 2017 macro funds found it relatively easy to raise capital-they are becoming more popular with investors in a world rife with political uncertainty. Macro funds position themselves to profit from the volatility in stocks, bonds, currencies, and commodities going forward.

So Jeffrey Talpins’ Element fund was not the only macro fund to raise capital this year.

Indeed, in the second quarter, Paul Singer’s $32.8 billion Elliott Management is opened up to investors for new capital in its multistrategy fund.

Moreover, earlier this year, Chris Rokos’s macro fund raised $2 billion before it even scheduled reopening on Feb. 1.

TRADING SOFTWARE

Dan Loeb targets Sony. Dan Loeb is an activist investor and founder of Third Point, which oversees about $14.5 billion in assets.

Last year the activist investor viewed Campbell soup as a bargain when Third point reported that the soup maker could fetch a takeover value of $52 to $58 per share.

A year later and the activist investor Dan Loeb targets Sony

Dan Loeb's activist hedge fund Third Point is raising an investment vehicle to generate between $500 million and $1 billion so it can continue to buy Sony shares, according to a recent report in Reuters.